Mr. Yakkety-Yak

Unlike many other people, my parents did not ever say to me when I was growing up “Someday you’ll have a child just like you and then it’ll be payback time.”

It happened anyway, without the explicit parental curse.

H talks constantly. And lately, with increasing certainty of his correctness and absurd confidence in his abilities (“I know how to build a TV,” “I can sew a beautiful wedding dress in one day, better than Gramma can,” “When I’m bigger I will build a house and I’ll show you how to do it.  Like when I’m nine.  Or maybe we can start tomorrow.”)  It suddenly hit a me a few days ago that I was just like that.  Maybe still am (notice the name of this blog?  Or the fact that I have a personal, blathering-style blog at all?)  Upon reflection, here is how I know I have produced a copy of myself in this regard:

  1. When I was 11, I made my sister a tape in which I talked and played music the entire time.  She recently re-discovered it and burned it to CD for me.  It consists of the observations of a very-certain 11-year-old on everything in front of her —  the style of an orchestra conductor, attempted performance and commentary on Monty Python skits I had never actually heard, and repeated, loud exclamations of “HA!”
  2. I played this CD in part for some friends, and they laughed and said I still talk exactly the same way — different-sounding voice, same way of expressing myself.
  3. When I was a child I regularly was chastised for “talking back.”  I generally felt unjustly punished, as from my point of view, I was simply trying to explain myself more clearly.
  4. I mentioned #3 to  Brad, and he laughed (a little hysterically — why?) and said “It’s a wonder your mother didn’t kill you.”
  5. I told my father of my realization too, and he told a story of my attempts to build a windmill that did all sorts of amazing things around the age of eight.  He was unable to dissuade me from my plans, and helped as best he could to get it to do, well, anything.  THIS IS A REGULAR OCCURRENCE HERE IN MY HOME.

Sigh.  Will Baby C be this damn loquacious and certain?  Probably so.  These children really are easy — normally developing but cautious about their own safety.  What could be easier?  (Answer: occasional silence).

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About sayingthings

K lives in the US with her man and kiddos, knits, cans, dehydrates, bakes bread, (but doesn't cook regular food, particularly), crochets, spins, gardens, studies for a degree that never seems to end, and um, works. Sometimes she wastes time online. Also -- and family, she's looking at you here -- sometimes she swears and says things you might not agree with. But she still loves you.

Posted on June 11, 2009, in Fambly. Bookmark the permalink. 3 Comments.

  1. I’m pretty sure I remember Mom saying something about your future children acting like you, although not the exact curse-wording you compared above.

  2. Who doesn’t know how to build a TV these days?

  3. Marie McMuffin

    “…with increasing certainty of his correctness and absurd confidence in his abilities,” sounds vaguely familiar!
    Although you’ve mostly got me suckered into just believing you, although I try to throw out a, “not true, absolutely not,” every once in awhile. Because, of course, I am often certain of my own correctness.

    #1 – Ha! You still do the “HA” thing. 🙂 And I SO want to hear this CD.

    #4 – In your defense, its possible you learned all these skills from your own mom.

    I think Baby C is already loquacious, just without a vocabulary that normally accompanies that label. Just wait ’til he’s got words to back up that song he’s always singing in the background!

    It really is always adorable to watch Big H so very certain and excited about things, and he almost always thinks my jokes are funny – who can’t love that!?, and he does sometimes call me out when I make something up, which makes me laugh. I think I can say we are mutually appreciative of each other’s sense of humors, Big H and I. Because we are both incredibly entertaining of course; I’m certain of it.

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